Electrophysiology Lab

The study of the heart's "electrical system" is called electrophysiology (EP). The heart beats because an electrical signal causes the heart muscle to contract and pump blood. When the signal is out of rhythm, it causes the heart to beat too fast or too slow.

Commonly treated rhythm disturbances include:

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Atrial flutter
  • Atrioventricular block
  • Bradycardia
  • Sick sinus syndrome
  • Supraventricular tachycardia
  • Ventricular tachycardia

To treat these conditions, our highly experienced physicians perform complex interventions including:

  • Advanced intracardiac mapping – Using ultrasound images to provide a detailed view of the heart and reflect the heart’s condition during cardiac procedures.
  • Cardioverter-Defibrillator – defibrillator testing and implantation – Implanting a small electronic device under the skin to send an electrical current to the heart muscle and restore normal rhythm.
  • Catheter ablation – Threading catheters (small, thin, flexible tubes) through the blood vessels to reach the heart and destroy (ablate) abnormal heart tissue.
  • Electrical cardioversion – Using metal paddles or patches on the chest wall to send an electric current to the heart and reset its regular rhythm pattern.
  • Intracardiac echocardiography – Using imaging to guide a transseptal catheter during electrophysiological mapping and ablation procedures.
  • Pacemaker testing and implantation – Implanting a small device under the skin of the chest or abdomen to help control abnormal heart rates.
  • Tilt table testing – Using a tilting table to evaluate the cause of unexplained fainting (syncope).
  • Transseptal catheterization – Using a catheter to cross the wall between the heart's two small chambers (atria) to access the left heart chambers. This is necessary to assess arrhythmias and perform ablation.

The lab is under the Medical Direction of Dao Gia Pham, MD, a cardiologist specializing in Electrophysiology. Dr. Pham is board-certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease and Nuclear Cardiology.

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